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September 2016 ~ Coming Soon

New Yorker by birth + AfroDominican by bloodline, Suhaly Bautista-Carolina is an artist, educator + cultural advocate. She earned her B.A. in English and American Literature from NYU and her MPA from the Wagner School of Public Service at NYU, where she was named one of “NYU’s 15 Most Influential Students.” 


Her attention to environmental justice earned her the artist name, The Earth Warrior. The Earth Warrior is interested in the way humans interact with and re(imagine) themselves in natural spaces. Her recent artwork explores themes of womynhood, the preservation of memory and the AfroLatinX experience.

Suhaly is currently working on an AfroLatina Portrait Project. "This forthcoming series of portraits + interviews (project name tbd) aims to catalogue how we (as self-identifying AfroLatinas) speak to/honor/dismiss/deal with the memory and existence of our African ancestry.

The final goal is to produce a catalogue of 100 portraits and interviews of AfroLatinas in New York City for a published book. I expect this to be a journey of several years + look forward to sharing this process, time and energy with you all."


Read Issue 11

August 1, 2016 ~ Issue 11

Welcome to a very special edition of Es Mi Cultura, entitled:

“Los Hombres”

As the title suggests, this issue spotlights just a few of the men who are doing their part to further advance our Afro-Latino culture. Through various arts, cooking, and education, Los Hombres featured in this issue are a great representation of people who put their all into the things they are passionate about.

This issue contains a lot of great information and is worth the lengthy time it may take to read through everything…ENJOY!


Read Issue 10

“Los Hombres” ~ Issue 10


Ghislaine Leon is a Harlem, NY native with roots in the Dominican Republic and a passion for Afro-Latino educations and empowerment. She is a Digital Marketing professional by day and the founder of art and spirituality site FearlessLeon.com
"The main thing that being an Afro-Latina means to me is breaking all those mental barriers that have been passed on from generation to generation among all Latinos. For too long we’ve been taught to hate our darker-skinned Latinos, so the main thing that being an Afro-Latina means to me is educating myself and educating people that I come across to not look at Black Latinos as any less. Being able to embrace our rich history; being able to embrace, understand, and continue to push Afro-Latino music whether it’s bomba, whether it’s plena, whether it’s palo, whether it’s Yoruba. It’s not forgetting those things.
Being an Afro-Latina to me means respecting our ancestors; it means honoring our ancestors. It means teaching other people like ‘Yo, I’m the same color as you, I may not speak the same language as you, but we come from the same place.’"

June 6, 2016 ~ Issue 9

Jes Perez in her own words: "In many Latin American countries, and also in the states, the issue of black heritage is considered a bit taboo. There is much talk, but it is known as something no one wants to hear or speak about. Especially being from the Dominican Republic, it is common for many people not to identify with his or her black heritage. I personally think they don't know the truth about their own story.


In my case I still see myself as the only person in my family who really identifies as an Afro-Latino. Most of my family sees themselves as just Latino(a), even though the color of their skin says otherwise. Growing up I remember my grandpa calling me, "La Negra." It wasn't a big deal but I was aware that I was a little darker than my cousins.

Let's take it back to 1804 when Haiti gained its independence and the remainder of the island made a bid for its own independence in 1821. When this attempt failed the Dominican Republic was ruled by Haiti for the next 22 years. And although the Dominican Republic gained independence in 1844, much  of the historic prejudice against Haitians stems from this 22 year period preceding independence. There's no single individual who has been more influential in how Dominicans view their own blackness than El General Rafael Trujillo. During his approximately thirty year dictatorship, he had a long-lasting effect on how Dominicans viewed race, blackness, and their own African heritage.
There is this hiding within the Latino culture, the hiding of the darker ones, the hiding of the ones who have curlier hair or bigger lips or a bigger nose. I have had encounters, even in the Latin entertainment field, where people didn't know where to place me or they didn't get me... because Dominicans can look like anything so..."

Read Issue 8

May 2, 2016 ~ Issue 8

Afro-Panamanian Sahsha Campbell-Garbutt is a mother, Wife, Writer, Author, Life Coach, and Wellness Advocate. She is also the founder of Life and Light Wellness, a firm that incorporates inspirational writings with holistic wellness for the spiritual, mental, and physical elevation of people. The child of two Panamanian parents, this Afro-Panamena is CPR/AED certified and helps her clients attain their physical wellness goals holistically as a Personal Trainer and their personal goals as a Life Coach.


Her approach is simple: To attain long lasting results in any venture, the work must be done from the inside out. Sahsha’s gentle, yet forthright “no short cuts” approach to healing incorporates meditation, self reflection, physical activity and addressing, for example “positive distractions” so her clients can utilize their time wisely to achieve their overall goals. In addition to her devotion for wellness, she’s a long-standing member of the Screen Actors Guild. Sahsha’s writing has been published in MindBodyGreenHuffington Post, Atlanta's Creative Loafing, andLennox and Parker Magazine. Sahsha is Co-Author of the best selling book, “20 Beautiful Women, Volume 3” and her book, “Life and Light: 111 Motivations and Messages”,will be released fall, 2016.

Read Issue 7

April 4, 2016 ~ Issue 7

Sulma Arzu-Brown is a proud Garifuna woman born in Honduras, Central America. "She came to New York City at the tender age of six. Throughout her life, Sulma’s parents instilled the belief that progressive thinking, education and sound values were the key to success in one’s personal and professional life.

Holding steadfast to those values, Sulma received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Herbert Lehman College of the City University of New York. Sulma took those teachings a step further when she became a mother by becoming one with her essence and growing out her natural hair. 

It was her way of encouraging her girls to love every aspect of themselves especially their hair. 
Sulma knew it was the right decision when her older daughter expressed “mommy we finally look alike” the day she cut off her chemically straightened hair. The book soon followed.

Read Issue 6

March 7, 2016 ~ Issue 6




Established in 2010, BoriquaChicks is an entertainment and lifestyle news blog that provides readers access to popular celebrity news stories and real life topics.

Founder, Raquel reflects on why she started Boriqua Chicks:
"As a child, I always loved to read about celebrities in the latest magazines—making sure that I stayed current in television, film and fashion news. However, there was one thing missing, I didn't really see a lot of stories about Black Latinos/as. Growing up with a Puerto Rican mother and an African-American father on the South Side of Chicago, I didn't have a lot of people around me that I could identify with.
Often my world was split in two parts. My mom created a home where we could embrace our Puerto Rican identity and we spent many summers visiting our family in Puerto Rico. In Chicago my African-American family and friends were influential in shaping my African-American identity. Whether people understood me or not, I always felt I had the best of two worlds*-- whether it was eating my mother's arroz con pollo (rice & chicken) or my paternal grandmother’s soul food.
Some years ago my friends began to say, "Why don't you start your own blog? You're always reading and talking about other blogs." I thought to myself, 'I guess so, why not?' I started the blog in 2010 and it has grown with a wide audience over the years. I started casually blogging and wanted to share news about topics I was interested in. Early on, Boriqua Chicks covered a lot of entertainment stories [some ratchetness :) too] with a focus on celebrities of color—specifically, African-Americans, Latinos/as and Afro-Caribbeans.
The addition of my sister Rebecca has strengthened the blog. My blog wasn't started to be divisive (as some people have questioned), but to share my thoughts with audience members that could personally relate to my story and those who have an affinity to read what my sister and I write about. Over the years we have worked to offer quality content and have also integrated more lifestyle topics into our editorial.


February 1, 2016 ~ Issue 5